Monday, April 26, 2010

What this is really about: keeping the Internet open for consumers



There’s been a lot of debate about the best way to implement the National Broadband Plan and open Internet rules after the recent Comcast decision. Lots of smart people have recommended reasonable solutions to the FCC’s jurisdictional headache.

We’ve said all along that what’s important to us is promoting an open Internet, and providing access for Americans to the best broadband possible. In comments filed today with the FCC, we say that “we continue to believe that the FCC has ample legal authority to adopt broadband openness rules” and that we support whatever jurisdictional fix is “most sustainable legally.”

To us this has never been about regulatory rigidity but about protecting consumers and keeping the Internet open for innovators. So while we’re not wed to any particular legal theory to justify the FCC’s jurisdiction, we do believe some minimal oversight over broadband networks is essential.

10 comments:

damion said...

I thinks that is a wonderful idea ,my blogs sites is also a great place to post technical questions or concerns.
https://sites.google.com/a/email.phoenix.edu/geeks-blogs/

Patnad said...

I'd recommand everyone concerned about net neutrality to read this bill the congress is trying to pass: are you concern by net neutrality, you should read this bill the congress is trying to pass, please pass the word to your reader as well....


http://hsgac.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=Files.View&FileStore_id=4ee63497-ca5b-4a4b-9bba-04b7f4cb0123

Riverwind said...

Net Neutrality, a cornerstone of free and open internet traffic, free speech and free software is under fire. It is the big software corporations and big telco that wants to strangle it. We the users of the Internet demand a free and open Internet.

Riverwind said...

Net Neutrality, a cornerstone of free and open internet traffic, free speech and free software is under fire. It is the big software corporations and big telco that wants to strangle it. We the users of the Internet demand a free and open Internet.

Mr.G said...

I will NOT support Net Neutrality until I feel freedom of information is being threatened to the extent that the consumer can't make a difference.

If an ISP DID block off a website, could we not just sue over a violation of the 1st Amendment?

It was only 16 years of overseeing cable TV before the FCC came to regulate cable television. Do you like cable TV? Do you like your standard, biased news channels?


I prefer this version of the bill:
http://stearnsforms.house.gov/UploadedFiles/Net_Neutrality_Bill.pdf

Riverwind said...

I bet Microsoft wants to get rid of net neutrality because they want to stiffle the open source movement. They want to put Linux out of commission. The greedy 800 pound gorilla is not getting enough banannas or something.

fil777 said...

The US must get back to anti-trust where only a few can can dictate over us all. Our mainstream TV and Press monopoly has ruined our free speech. The news we get from the mainstream is fragmented and very often only one side of the half truth. The same thing will happen with the net if it is allowed to monopolze. The internet is fine as it now is.

cosmosiff said...

I think the corporations have become so greedy, that they are dangerous to the viability of our nation. Not a day goes by that corporations somewhere in this country don't gouge the citizens. They want to squeeze every last nickel out of us and now this.

I won't pay them anymore than they already get. There's always a way to circumvent these gangsters. I'm done with Google.

mark said...

If we loose net neutrality I'm going to leave the internet. Forever.

Brandon Joyce said...

I think recent actions of Google should be watched very, very.... very closely. The thing about business is that the most criminal actions, these days, take place of a level of economic understanding over most people's heads. Now, add that to information technology, and even fewer people are going to fully understand. This needs to be codified in law. We cannot trust any company— no matter how altruistic their record or slogans— to make this decision for us.