Friday, July 27, 2007

Boston Globe: spectrum plan "good for consumers"



The Boston Globe editorial board weighs in today on the spectrum reform debate, saying that "opening up wider access to a significant part of spectrum could jump-start wireless service in the United States -- for broadband, telephone, and who knows what else," and that "the FCC needs to adjust the auction rules so that this space becomes a competitive Internet marketplace." The Globe also writes that:

The Google plan would also be good for consumers. It would encourage the development of a national wireless system, providing competition to keep the cost down in communities now served by wired broadband and improving access in underserved areas, such as the Berkshires, that are too sparsely populated to justify private investment now.

The Globe is the only newspaper to weigh in on the spectrum debate. Earlier this month, USA Today and the Los Angeles Times also said that our proposal could help stimulate competition and bring the "broadest public benefit from these valuable public airwaves."

4 comments:

Libran Lover said...

Instead of waiting for more publications to weigh-in with their support of an open spectrum, Google should proactively educate journalists and editors about this issue. Is Google doing something to reach out to the publishers of newspapers, magazines and other mainstream publications so that the awareness of this important issue is heightened?

The general public is even less aware of this issue, than they are about the Net Neutrality issue. That needs to change.

insideout said...

I am hoping that even Cell phone maker companies like Motorola and Nokia will also come out in favor of the open access wireless. These companies are also tied by the service providers like AT&T; Many features in their new phones are routinely 'disabled' by these service providers. As a result, companies like Motorola have not been successful in providing really good phones, and before iPhone came into the picture, the cellphone market in US was literally dead.
If users can use any device on the wireless network, then it will good for the cell phone makers too. People can quickly switch their phones for newer and better models without the fear of breaking a contract.

tark said...

While interesting to hear how the MSM thinks your proposal is the best thing since bubble tea, it would be far more informative to hear a response to Cringely's criticism (http://www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/2007/pulpit_20070727_002573.html). I suppose this would never happen, though, given the sensitive nature of poker strategy...

Dave said...

I'm impressed that the Globe finally hit the nail on the head on this issue. What we really need now is a refutation of CTIA's hilarious media campaign.

Last Thursday, I opened up The Politico to find a full page color ad on page 2 from CTIA claiming that Google's auction terms would make things "less open and less competitive", implying they would make the spectrum use closed. I couldn't help but laugh at how blatantly dishonest this was. Maybe the WaPo, following their front page piece today on the auction and Google's policy team, will take CTIA to task for this campaign.