Thursday, January 14, 2010

Hey FCC, keep the Internet open -- and awesome!



There's a lot of awesome stuff on the Internet: Cats talking LOLspeak. Iranian dissidents tweeting. Live traffic updates. Science experiments.

All of these things, and so much more, are possible because of the openness of the Internet. Any entrepreneur with an idea has always been able to create a website and share their ideas globally – without paying extra tolls to have their content seen by other users. An open Internet made Google possible eleven years ago, and it's going to make the next Google possible.

In our comments filed today in the FCC's proposed rulemaking docket, we explained that our goal is straightforward: "to keep the Internet awesome for everybody."

The Internet was designed to empower users. Its open, "end-to-end" architecture means that users – not network providers or anyone else – decide what succeeds or fails online. It's a formula that has worked incredibly well, resulting in mind blowing innovation, incredible investment, and more consumer choice than ever.

For the online world's first three decades, a set of FCC regulations protected the openness of the communications on-ramps. Unfortunately, those safeguards were stripped away back in 2005, which since then has led to confusion, uncertainty, and, in some cases, bad acts.

That's why we've argued that the FCC should re-adopt rules to prevent network providers from discriminating against certain services, applications, or viewpoints on the Web, and requiring them to be transparent about how they manage their networks.

More specifically, in our FCC filing, we support:
  • Adding a nondiscrimination principle that bans prioritizing Internet traffic based on the ownership (the who), the source (the what) of the content or application;
  • Adding a transparency principle that ensures all users have clear information about broadband providers' offerings;
  • Providing a carefully-defined "reasonable network management" exception so that broadband providers are empowered to address genuine congestion issues and protect against hazards like malware and spamming;
  • Applying general openness protections to both wireline and wireless broadband infrastructure; and
  • Creating better enforcement mechanisms at the FCC, and introducing the concept of technical advisory groups (TAGs) to potentially provide expert advice and resolve disputes.
I sat down with Megan Stull, our telecom policy counsel, to discuss these and other issues. Forgive our video editing, it's a little Max Headroom-ish, but hey that's one of the things that make the Internet awesome.

20 comments:

RDpopular said...

Google always the best choice... Always up-to-date..Good Jobs...
From : EsungDo

Vijay said...

I second in this..! This internet is gotta' be open.

Kirk said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
布袋和尚 said...

我必须用中文来表达我的敬意,为了自由和尊严。

I have to show my respect to google with Chinese Character, for freedom and dignity.

Kurt Welch said...

The best internet will always be the one that is the most un-biased, open and engaging. What would Jimmy Wales (founder of Wikipedia) say? "Imagine a world in which every person on the planet has free access to the sum of all human knowledge." That is a world in which I would like to live and a world that an open and awesome internet can provide.

elena said...

You guys are awesome! Thank you for your hard work to protect all of us from the small-mindedness and selfishness of a few.

You self-less-ness and open-mindedness is highly commendable and an amazing example for others at your scale and level.

It's inspirational!: it provides hope for our society's future and provides some evidence of better human nature.

Internet awesomeness forever for everyone!

"can't sit on the sidelines" - priceless

Cyker Way said...

Google should consider doing proxy jobs. There is great desire for that kind of tool, especially in some area from which Google has to leave. The chef and wireless network in the building are both great. I'll miss them...

Ian said...

Yup!!
Agreed With the Fact!!
Google hats Off To You..


SEO Services Company

Ubuntu said...

Thank You. You are a very large company, both you and version. You word means something. I know true openness of the internets will take some time but I would really like to know at least what my ISPs are doing. I would like them to inform the users of their limitations and practices. Whether they throttle traffic or cap certain services. All we see on this end is the maximum speed we may achieve. It is like we drive down a highway blindfolded only knowing the speed limit.

Daniel Ly said...

Please could you provide a transcript as I am Deaf. Thank you.

terry said...

And you expect us not to know about Google's separate private dealings with Verizon that will serve to undermine all the beautiful noble sentiments you espouse here? http://www.publicknowledge.org/public-knowledge-calls-verizon-google-deal-‘regret

Brian said...

Google - could you explain how your talks with Verizon ( http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/05/technology/05secret.html?_r=2&emc=eta1 ) to prioritize traffic to consumers is consistent with this policy!? As a user of an Android phone with Verizon as a carrier, I do not support and am extremely troubled by these proceedings.

Grant Smith said...

So how has so much changed in the last six months that it is now Google's goal to help Verizon end Net Neutrality? http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/05/technology/05secret.html?partner=rss&emc=rss

mantis said...

Regarding today's article in the NYTimes:
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/05/technology/05secret.html?pagewanted=1&hp

What happened to this? (from the above post) :
"Adding a nondiscrimination principle that bans prioritizing Internet traffic .."

I have been looking all over for a place to email a public policy comment/concern to somebody at Google, but this is the best I could find.

I've really believed in Google Inc., against my natural distrust of corporations, as a company that was trying to innovate and "[not] be evil". But making a deal with the devil (in this case Verizon) to implement pay-to-play hierarchies in web traffic; well that seems ... possibly pretty evil.
Granted the above reports aren't corroborated, but with back-room deals, isn't that the problem? By the time we hear about it its too late.

So, what Im saying is, Google, please dont abandon your principles!!
Thanks

Robin Burks said...

SO Google, if you truly believe this. WTF is up with this deal with Verizon you're working on? I HOPE you remember you support net neutrality!!!!!!!!

Katie said...

I am confused by these postings by Google due to this article in the NY Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/05/technology/05secret.html?hp

If you really believe the internet should be kept free and open, then please do not go forward on this deal with Verizon.

Ted James said...

THANKS A LOT. JERKS.

Jonester said...

Very contradicting compared to what [evil] your doing with Verizon. Great option if you want your company do go down in flames. The [now controlled] Internet is a dog-eat-dog world, be careful or you'll be the next Microsoft.

John said...

man, a lot has changed in 8 months...

Google and Verizon Near Deal on Web Pay Tiers

http://community.nytimes.com/comments/www.nytimes.com/2010/08/05/technology/05secret.html

Jordan said...

I see a whole lot of righteously indignant posts above, quoting and referencing the NY Times. I have an idea...why don't you go to the source and make up your own mind. What's this? I think it's the actual proposal put forward. Read it and make up your mind, or continue letting someone else tell you what to think and keep it to yourself...